Letters to the Editor – June 5, 2020

Protesters wearing protective face coverings peacefully march down Broadway from the State Capitol despite the 9 p.m. curfew in Denver, Colorado, U.S., June 1, 2020. Picture taken June 1, 2020. REUTERS/Alyson McClaran

Civil unrest in the wake of death

I express my sympathies and condolences to the family of the late George Floyd, an African-American man, who was allegedly killed by police in the Powderhorn community of Minneapolis. I have been following the news and seeing videos of the riot in the United States and scenes are ugly and scary. It took the late George Floyd eight minutes and 46 seconds to die and this sparked anger and frustration as people have come on to the streets to protest against police brutality in the United States. The late George’s death has divided the United States racially and has fanned the flames of hatred and the protests have come just as communities across the United States have come out of the effects of COVID-19. It’s a sad day for the United States and I hope and pray that the situation is controlled. It’s sad to see that extreme force was used to quell public outcry and outrage. Rajnesh Ishwar Lingam Nadawa, Nasinu

Small yet big

We may be a small country still in the development stages but we have proven that we can manage our way through extreme challenges such as COVID- 19 and cyclones simultaneously. Of course our developed neighbours and our long-time partners have assisted us immensely which we will cherish throughout our lives. There may have been differing views during this pandemic on how we see and do things but it seems we have won the game over COVID- 19. As for cyclones, they may get wilder and wilder but our unity within the limits of our capacities will keep us strong at family level, community level as well as at national level. Let us help each other within our reach and let a wave of positivity over every challenge that we may be in or yet to come. Be positive and strong. This will make us big within our smallness. Dhirendra Prasad Lautoka

Reality on the ground

The picture on page 5 (FT, 03/06/20) is proof of the level of suffering our people have to endure on a daily basis. The level of desperation is significantly high which needs a serious attention by our community leaders, religious and social organisations as well as the Government. Of course, the Government is doing what it can within its means as well as various individuals, business organisations and other social organisations, but I believe we need a reality check with data for constructive and organised assistance from service-oriented personalities and or organisations. Looking at the plight of Maya Wati, I cannot control my emotions as I have personally seen such situations elsewhere as well. Added to their suffering is the fact that they do not have a house of their own. I hope some good Samaritans would find them and assist as per their need. By the way, do they have children? If yes, where are they and under what circumstances? My salute to madam Maya Wati and many others elsewhere for taking care of her husband despite the suffering she endures daily. The reality is that we have people living under extreme poverty levels but we also do not lack good Samaritans as well. Dhirendra Prasad Lautoka

Never-ending cycles

Life is just a never-ending round of cycles, phases, peaks and troughs. Climate change and the current pandemic are events that are obviously part of such inevitable changes. However, there are different views and theories as to their current positions in the cycle. Are we at the end or the beginning? Are we at a peak, or are we in the dip? Are there short term peaks and troughs? Or are they just part of a bigger cycle of larger peaks and troughs, spread over aeons. In any case, what we understand as “normal” now was obviously once the “new normal” some time ago. In other words, the “new normal” back then, slowly over time normalised to be just accepted as the “normal”. This is, up until now. We are now facing a “newer normal”. Over time, in the near future, it will slowly become to be accepted as “normal”. This will be, until such time as a “new normal” appears again sometime in the distant future. And so it goes on, in phases and cycles, ad infinitum. As they say there is nothing new under the sun. What was once will once again be. Edward Blakelock Admiral Circle, Pacific Harbour

Retired teachers

Would it be possible for retired school teachers to come together form pocket groups of the subject they teach, and help? It will be for the sake of our children. Your pay will be the delight all teachers get when they see a student they taught progress well into higher education. It’s just a thought. Allen Lockington Kava Place, Lautoka

Investigative work Journalists

I believe ought to be more investigative and do some groundwork, like their overseas counterparts, when covering a story. Watching a local television station the other day, there was a program highlighting the
plight of the vendors whose businesses abruptly ended in the fire at the Value City Flea market complex in the capital two weeks ago. When watching the two programs the concerned vendors were simply and
repeatedly requesting Government for assistance to continue their trading. I assume this may mean
monetary rescue and not at any time did the reporter mention that the line minister or the ministry was
approached for a direct answer and assist to the particular problem. Also as this is bread and butter issue they need help from the top and as quick as possible. TANIELA SENIKUTA, Sauva, Tailevu

Fiji Rugby Union

World Rugby is on the verge of delivering findings of an investigation into the chairmanship of Fiji Rugby Union (FRU). For the advancement and good of the sport, the local governing body urgently needs to make some drastic changes in order for FRU to gain much needed sponsorship deals and backup support programs. I believe the power that is, is the one that is really holding FRU back here and he alone is the one that needs to make the decision for FRU to move forward. The day authority takes complete responsibility of the deteriorating state of FRU, the day they man up and accept that there is no accountability and transparency, is the day FRU starts making it to the top of the rugby world. In this time and age FRU needs key professionals to lead us to the top. No doubt we have all the attributes to become world champions. It’s a matter of having the right people who have the experience, are fair, accountable, and trustworthy. There are many businesses both local and abroad who would love to sponsor FRU but sadly none want to get involved because of the current personnel involved. Current office holders from the top down ought to man up and step aside for the betterment of our number one sport. Do the right thing and resign to make way for a new order of professionals. Fijian rugby fans both local and abroad deserve much better. Otherwise the findings of the investigation by World Rugby is simple going to make things worse. The clock is ticking! Simon Hazelman Rava Estate, Savusavu

Parents’ role

The past few weeks on Cucurui TV program interesting discussion has been made on the role parents play in a child’s life. In every stage of life a child looks up to elders in the family be it grandparents or parents for support and guidance. Irrespective of one’s educational, financial or social status all parents have a role to play. By providing basic needs does not end parental duty. The behavioural pattern that one displays to their child makes a lot of difference in their upbringing. How one treats ones spouse or child verbally, emotionally, physically matters on the thoughts of every child. From childhood, teens to adulthood children are told to behave and speak the truth but if on the other hand elders portray the opposite what do you expect a child to learn? As a parent it’s easy to dish out advice but to follow the same isn’t equally easy. Just because you’re the parent does not mean that you are always right. Taking other family members opinion into consideration in decisionmaking helps in many ways. By lending an ear you can iron out differences and make the journey smooth. Respect is something to be earned and maintained. Not demanded and destroyed! Likewise, advice and example is to be set and followed because what goes around comes around. One can’t just claim the title “Head of the House”. But needs to fulfil its responsibly with positivity only then can you pass the information of proper leadership to the next generation. It is the elders that lead by example. As the saying goes: “Charity begins at home!” So it’s wise that one realises, accepts and corrects one’s faults rather than denying and refusing to accept. One must make sure that their words match their acts to keep the family integrity intact. Be the role model at home before you step out. Prameeta Chand Donu Place, Namadi Heights, Suva

Great loss

SIX-year-old Gianna Floyd will never be able to see her father again. It will be traumatising for her to grow up knowing that he did not die of natural cause but was mercilessly killed by a policeman who had no regard for human life. The incident has sparked widespread anger in America resulting in violent protests against this heinous crime. There are so many families who may be going through the same pain and agony having lost their loved ones in similar circumstances in Fiji. Some of these cases were recently highlighted in the media. Such violence crime against humanity must stop for it has no place in a civilised society. SELWA NANDAN Lautoka

Soccer action

Finally the world soccer body FIFA too has come to its senses. It has set aside its archaic regulation of no player political protest to say the current player protest against racism in solidarity with the worldwide protest over the brutal racist police killing of George Floyd in America was justified. FIFA president said the players should not be punished but be appreciated. Too right. That’s FIFA showing some maturity in its outlook. Rajend Naidu Sydney, Australia

School issue

I believe reopening schools will become a burden for government with subsidies they are obligated to pay. So my prediction is school will start after the budget announcement. Dan Urai Lautoka

Line ministers

I remember in the past line ministers would officiate at the opening of markets, schools and the like. Well, I wonder who will officiate when a new block of toilets will be opened! (gasp) Allen Lockington Kava Place, Lautoka

Brain size

I wonder what size brain does Jan Nissar have and whether its thinking capacity is directly proportional to the size of his adopted Kangaroo land (FT 03/06). Nishant Singh Lautoka

US visitors

Americans ranking Fiji as a country to visit (FT 02/6) is good news .To actually visit is another. I recall the Uber driver I met in San Francisco who rated Fiji as a country many would love to visit but too expansive. Dan Urai Lautoka Litter laws During the environment week, there should be a comprehensive re-evaluation on how strictly litter laws are currently enforced around the country? Mohammed Imraz Janif Natabua, Lautoka

Great loss

SIX-year-old Gianna Floyd will never be able to see her father again. It will be traumatising for her to grow up knowing that he did not die of natural cause but was mercilessly killed by a policeman who had no regard for human life. The incident has sparked widespread anger in America resulting in violent protests against this heinous crime. There are so many families who may be going through the same pain and agony having lost their loved ones in similar circumstances in Fiji. Some of these cases were recently highlighted in the media. Such violence crime against humanity must stop for it has no place in a civilised society. SELWA NANDAN Lautoka

Soccer action

Finally the world soccer body FIFA too has come to its senses. It has set aside its archaic regulation of no player political protest to say the current player protest against racism in solidarity with the worldwide protest over the brutal racist police killing of George Floyd in America was justified. FIFA president said the players should not be punished but be appreciated. Too right. That’s FIFA showing some maturity in its outlook. Rajend Naidu Sydney, Australia

School issue

I believe reopening schools will become a burden for government with subsidies they are obligated to pay. So my prediction is school will start after the budget announcement. Dan Urai Lautoka

Line ministers

I remember in the past line ministers would officiate at the opening of markets, schools and the like. Well, I wonder who will officiate when a new block of toilets will be opened! (gasp) Allen Lockington Kava Place, Lautoka

Brain size

I wonder what size brain does Jan Nissar have and whether its thinking capacity is directly proportional to the size of his adopted Kangaroo land (FT 03/06). Nishant Singh Lautoka

US visitors

Americans ranking Fiji as a country to visit (FT 02/6) is good news .To actually visit is another. I recall the Uber driver I met in San Francisco who rated Fiji as a country many would love to visit but too expansive. Dan Urai Lautoka

Litter laws

During the environment week, there should be a comprehensive re-evaluation on how strictly litter laws are currently enforced around the country? Mohammed Imraz Janif Natabua, Lautoka

 

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