Letters to the Editor: Friday September 13, 2019

A reader browses through the 150th birthday article in the Fiji Times newspaper yesterday. Picture: ELIKI NUKUTABU.

Back in time

I’m glad that via The Fiji Times (12/09) I was able to read an important part of Fiji’s history –– the signing of the Deed of Cession at Nasova on October 10, 1874.

Apart from The Fiji Times, The Sydney Morning Herald and the Melbourne Argus were the other print media that covered this important aspect of our history.

Furthermore, it delighted me to read that The Fiji Times will bring readers excerpts of news covered as well as interviews with various people associated with The Fiji Times over the years.

The good work of the late George Littleton Griffiths has today turned out to be an important historical document and I’m sure that students doing history at secondary and tertiary level can always count on The Fiji Times archives for reliable information.

Thank you The Fiji Times for keeping readers abreast with news and information from the past.

Yesterday’s letter titled “Masterpiece of an editorial” by Janif hit the nail.

Vinaka vakalevu The Fiji Times for leading the way!

RAJNESH ISHWAR LINGAM, Nadawa, Nasinu

 

9/11 documentary

The History channel showed a documentary about those who were fortunate to escape the 9/11 twin towers disaster.

The event changed their lives after they realised how fortunate they were to make it out alive.

The survivors, many speaking publicly for the first time, told their stories and what it was really like to be inside the twin towers on 9/11.

What amazed me most of all about the documentary was that the survivors all changed for the better in their relationship with their spouses, their siblings, their parents, their children, their family and with others.

They all came to realise that we should never take life for granted.

I guess it takes a disaster for humans to band together and be kind to one another.

If it takes a catastrophe to teach us to be kind to each other then what kind of being are we? Such is life!

SIMON HAZELMAN, Rava Estate, Savusavu

 

At peace

I live in an isolated area in Raviravi having moved from Lovu.

We moved for a few reasons.

Having moved so far, our shopping is done for the month with what money I earn from selling vegetables. I am away from the media and we do not have electricity so we do not have TV and no radio.

I get on to the internet when someone visits or when we sell a bit extra to buy data for our seldom used mobile phone.

Good for us a cousin gave me a solar charger for my mobile phone.

But we have a peaceful way of life just minding our own business and suddenly I get a visitor who comes and I am on the internet.

Then I ask to read about the Rugby World Cup on the person’s phone.

But I am curious so I just get a glance of the news.

And I am accosted by what has been happening in our somewhat beloved Parliament.

I quietly log out and return the person’s phone.

“Sa that was fast!” the visitor says.

I just smile and say thank you, I wanted to say that our peace had been shattered by the news I just read.

I prefer to just be at peace with the world and one with nature.

Many people will pay a lot of money to have what we have, and no news is good news.

Meanwhile, I will be looking for a Fiji flag to hang up to show our support for the Fiji team.

Toso Viti toso.

MERE LAGILAI, Raviravi, Ba

 

Sugar industry

Given the millions of dollars given by us taxpayers to keep farmers in a job, it sickens me to see the burnt cane percentage delivered to the mills.

This practice attracts high processing costs, and probably impurity penalties by the purchaser, driving up more subsidies to the industry.

Fiji is trying to do its bit for the environment, sending clouds of burned leaves to choke us does little to endear me further to the industry.

If taxpayers had a choice I would not give a cent to the industry, nor, after last Friday’s performance in Parliament, would I give a penny towards MPs’ salary.

The august House in my opinion is full of mainly self-interested people who have absolutely no sense of fairness and consistency.

Continually blowing hard and achieving very little but spending a fortune doing it is how they measure themselves.

The only august House I have seen that exhibits worse behaviour is the UK.

I once visited late one night, there were seven Conservatives, six Labour members sprawled out on the benches, and a Speaker who was asleep.

ALLAN LOOSLEY, Tavua

 

Climate change

It’s interesting to see how the discussions and the emphasis placed on the climate change issue has evolved over time.

The narrative in the early years was on the greenhouse effect and greenhouse gases.

It then changed to global warming and sea level rising.

Over the past decade it has been climate change and man-made carbon emissions.

EDWARD BLAKELOCK, Admiral Circle, Pacific Harbour

 

Photo sharing

Very saddening to see people posting and sharing photos on social media of the guy found dead near the Lautoka FSC mill.

So many words of blessings I could have used to refer to this type of people but it wouldn’t be printed.

Condolences to the family.

WISE MUAVONO Balawa, Lautoka

 

Secrets Act

When I joined the civil service in 1977, I signed the Official Secrets Act which I was told would bind me even after I left.

Do new recruits or employees still sign this?

Or have things changed?

ALLEN LOCKINGTON Kava Place, Waiyavi, Lautoka

 

Road upgrade

Reiterating my similar letter to the editor (FT 16/02/2018) regarding the above subject.

Motorists are breathing freely now after the opening of the four-lane road from Nakasi to Nausori.

But we will have to hold our breath and rage after the announcement by the FRA chief executive officer, Jonathan Moore, that over the next few months the FRA and EFL contractors will be laying underground power cables along the four-lane road.

This, he says, will take up to six months to complete and during this time, one lane maybe closed but not on a daily basis.

He further stated that the four-lane road was more than a $50 million project and with proper routine maintenance, the road is expected to last for the next 25 years.

Hopefully the EFL contractors will work with the FRA specialist brought in from overseas and not dig up the million dollar project.

The main question here is, where was EFL when the road was under reconstruction? Praying that TFL and WAF do not have any upcoming projects along this corridor also.

PHILIP ISAAC, Nausori

 

All Blacks

The All Blacks beat Tonga 92-3 and the Fiji-Tonga game was very close.

Mathematically, the All Blacks have a very high chance of winning this world cup, but then in sports anything can happen.

SUKHA SINGH, Labasa

Let’s move on

The guy did not get terminated but he resigned.

Indeed he received the lesser of the two evils.

That’s the fact of the matter.

Nothing anybody can do about it.

Move on with life.

SIMON HAZELMAN Rava Estate, Savusavu

A precedent

An advice to workers.

In the unlikely event you swear, manhandle or threaten a fellow worker, show remorse and apologise.

A precedent has been set by the PM. Use it.

DAN URAI Lautoka

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